Zinda Rahen To Kis Ke Khatir


Uf Yeh Beevian (Oh, These Wives!) is an Urdu film released in 1977 that  racked up more than 75 weeks in Karachi’s cinema halls to bag Diamond Jubilee status.

S. Suleman, a director who seemed to have a knack for producing hit movies, began his career playing the young version of Dilip Kumar’s character in 1948’s popular Mela. After migrating to Pakistan with his brothers who included the matinée idols Santosh Kumar and Darpan, Suleman established a reputation as a socially conscious and sensitive director.  Many of his films such as Lori (Lullaby) and Baji were praised and appreciated for their progressive social messages.  They were also popular. Baji, which starred both of Suleman’s brothers,  attracted 5 Nigar Awards including the coveted Best Picture Award in 1963.

Suleman was not one to sit on his laurels.  Conscious of the tendency among his peers to rely on formulas and plagiarizing movies from across the border he deliberately set out to try new things. Comedy proved to be the new frontier he was looking for and throughout the 1960s and 70s he created several well regarded and fondly remembered comic films like Uf Yeh Beevian.

An outrageous early scene which depicts what can only be called a home invasion by a group of clap happy dancers not withstanding,Uf Yeh Beevian begins as a standard middle class social drama. Zahid (Shahid) is informed by his auntie with whom he lives, that arrangements have been made for his engagement to a lovely girl, Nadira (Shabnam) from Lahore. But when they return from the airport trouble is already brewing. Nadira is modern and liberated but rude, entitled and agressive. Zahid and his aunt are horrified and beg  her to leave.

Similar disasters unfold when Zahid pays a visit to Lahore and discovers that Nadira is now a panch waqt namazi (prays 5 times a day) and ultra conservative Islamic girl. Zahid is totally confused until Nadira confesses that she’s been testing him and that in fact she loves him and hopes he will marry her.  Delighted and relieved Zahid does exactly that and they set the wedding date for after Nadira’s return from Nairobi where she goes to visit family. Tragically, Zahid reads of a plane crashing near Nairobi killing all aboard. Nadira is assumed dead and Zahid sinks into a depression and upon the advice of a friend takes up drinking whisky to drown his grief.

Concerned family and friends arrange another marriage for Zahid with a feisty controlling girl named Najma (Najma) who manages to make Zahid forget Nadira. One day out of the blue, however, Nadira inexplicably appears in Zahid’s house, healthy and ready to pick up where she left off before flying to Nairobi. What follows for the rest of the film is Zahid running between Nadira and Najma in ever more ridiculous circumstances. Shahid most known as a romantic lead reveals an easy way with comedic material and plays the exasperated and increasingly exhausted husband with aplomb. Both wives soon cotton on to the deception and in their own turns express their anger by using their legs and fists on poor Zahid.

At this point one may be tempted to note a hint of the progressive social commentary S Suleman loved so much: women are standing up for their rights and refusing to be belittled by the patriarchy that permits men to enjoy multiple women. But one would be wrong. For very quickly the film resolves the drama in a most reactionary way.  Zahid’s driver (Lehri) explains to the angry wives that his boss had kept his double marriage secret because ‘he didn’t want to hurt your feelings. He loves you both.’  When they hear this Nadira and Najma join forces and voices (they speak the same lines in unison) and rescue Zahid who is ready to leap to his death from the top of a building.  “We will all live together in the same house,” they assure Zahid and enjoy a final group hug as the films rolls to farcical end.

Zinda Rahein to Kis ki Khatir (For Whom Should I Stay Alive?) is the best song of this otherwise silly movie.  Zahid is reeling from Nadira’s apparent death in the plane crash and with his alcoholic friend Mushtaq takes to the bottle at a Islamabad club.  The music composed by M Ashraf is modern enough for dancing but sufficiently low key to match the mood of a desperately sad Zahid.  Mehdi Hassan gives Agha Hassan Imtisal’s down beat lyrics a suitably melancholy tone. Actor, singer and lyricist work together to make a poignant and moving moment the highlight of the film.






Ae Mere Anokhe Hamrahi


Aakhri Station (Last Station) is an Urdu film released in December 1965. Based on the Urdu short story Pagli by the ‘feminist’ writer Hajra Masroor the film was a labour of love by the popular poet ‘Suroor’ Barakankvi, who produced, directed, scripted and wrote the songs for the movie.

Aakhri Station is prime example of East Pakistani film making: literary, socially conscious and proudly Bengali. Set against the backdrop of a large industrial project in rural Bengal the story centers on the romance of Jamil (Haroon) an honest engineer who is framed by corrupt contractors and Fawzia (Rani) the Station Master’s daughter. Shabnam, who in the 70s would go on to be Pakistan’s most beloved actress, plays Jamila a mad woman who lives on the platform of the station. Though she has few lines Shabnam delivers a memorable performance full of understated pathos.  Her character represents and reflects the cruelty and corruption that permeates every society, even a young and hopeful one such as 1960s East Pakistan. It is tempting but probably unfair to read a political message into the story, of how powerful Urdu speaking outsiders have raped an innocent beautiful Bengali woman and abandoned her on the margins of society.

‘Suroor’ Barabankvi a writer/poet from the Urdu heartland of Lucknow had attended several mushairas (poetry recitals) in Dhaka in the early 1950s. Like many others he found himself so captured by the artistic atmosphere in the city that when he was offered the job of heading up the Anjuman-e-Taraqqi-e-Urdu (Society for the Advancement of Urdu) in Dhaka he officially migrated to Pakistan.  In addition to editing a literary magazine Barabankvi turned his hand to script and song writing for the small film industry that began to emerge in Dhaka in the late 1950s.

Though he is best remembered for his lyrics and poems he did produce three films one of which is the underrated Aakhri Station. He enlisted the services of another Renaissance man, Khan Ataur Rehman to set his lyrics to music. Rehman was from a well off family and on track to become a doctor until he dropped out of med school in the hope of becoming a playback singer.  Unfortunately, he was rounded up by a relative at the railway station as he waited for a train to take him to Bombay.  But undeterred he made a second escape a few months later and succeeded in making it to Bombay where he slept on the footpaths as he looked for work. Sensing the prospects were better in Karachi he moved to that city and then to Europe before returning home to Dhaka in 1956 where he starred in the famous ‘art’ movie Jago Hua Savera.

Rehman’s score for Aakhri Station oozes with the warm, genteel, folky feelings that so characterise Bengali music.

Ae Mere Anokhe Hamrahi (Oh, My One of a Kind Travelling Companion) is a little gem of a song, melodious and simple. Sung by Bashir Ahmad another Bengali with an impressive pedigree–he was a student of both Ustad Vilayat Khan and Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan–the song is the point at which Jamil first expresses his love for Fawzia.  Bashir Ahmad had a bouyant tenor voice that was not dissimilar to that of Ahmed Rushdi whom he clearly admired. After the 1971 Civil War which resulted in East Pakistan becoming Bangladesh Ahmad took his chances in West Pakistan but Rushdi was at his zenith.  He found it difficult to interest music directors in a voice that sounded so like the number 1 playback singer. In 1975 he returned to the east where he continued to write and sing in the fast growing Bangladeshi film industry. In 2003 he won the Best Male Playback Singer Award.